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It's All About Tea — history

How To Make Butter Tea With Pu-Erh

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

While butter tea usually causes confusion in most not familiar with it, it actually has a rich and interesting history. It has been a staple for people living in the Himalayas for centuries and continues to be so.

 

WHAT IS BUTTER TEA?

Butter tea has many names in different languages but is commonly known as po cha. It originated in the Tibetan Himalayas but is now commonly enjoyed throughout Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, India, western China and Mongolia. To make butter tea, four ingredients are needed: tea leaves, butter, water, and salt.

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A Deeper Look Into Hei Cha

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Hei Cha is a post-fermented tea, just like Shou Pu-erh. In fact, essentially, Shou Pu-erh is Hei Cha. But it's not that simple. Not everyone can tell the difference between Hei Cha and Pu-erh.

Hei Cha is an ancient tea with a rich tea history. For example, the original processing techniques of Liu Bao Hei Cha served as the basis for modern-day Ripe Pu-erh preparation. (Read more)

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All About The Best Jasmine Tea

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Jasmine tea always tops the favorites list of tea drinkers who like sweet and exceptionally aromatic teas. While most of our teas have floral aromas solely because of the processing and growing regions, the floral scent of jasmine tea actually comes from it being infused with the flowers. 

The flavor of a quality jasmine tea will be sweet, refreshing, and exceptionally aromatic! When brewing jasmine tea, the scent of the flowers immediately fills the room. It’s a celebration of the senses. The aroma of jasmine tea is known to relax and alleviate the mood. People who drink jasmine tea regularly say they feel much happier and relaxed. Particularly when choosing a tea for relaxation, we recommend jasmine tea without hesitation! (Read more)

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Tie Guan Yin, Part II

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

In our previous blog post on Tie Guan Yin, we already discussed the brief history and processing method of this delicious oolong tea. Tie Guan Yin remains a worldwide favorite amongst tea enthusiasts. It’s in the top ten of best Chinese teas, top three best Taiwanese teas, and indeed in most if not all best oolong categories! Let’s take a more in-depth look into why this is so. (Read more)

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Lapsang Souchong vs Non-Smoky Lapsang Souchong Black Tea

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Lapsang Souchong (Zhengshan Xiaozhong) is an acquired taste, much like a ripe pu-erh is. Some people love its deep campfire notes and the warm, comforting feeling the tea provides. Others find these roasted notes too strong and may have unwanted associations with food when drinking the tea. Luckily, for the latter, there is Non-smoky Lapsang Souchong. (Read more)

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