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It's All About Tea — ancient tea

Gong Fu Cha — Making Sure Your Tea Doesn’t Lose Flavor

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

As most tea enthusiasts already know, there are different ways of making tea. For example, you can brew it western-style or gongfu style. When talking about quality Asian tea, most of us might choose to make our drink the gong fu cha way. We can taste how it transforms throughout multiple brews when we make tea gong fu style.

For this reason, it’s also essential to understand how many brews each tea type can withstand. Furthermore, how to prolong the brew count of each variety. We’ll discuss this more in today’s article. (Read more)

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Let's Get Tea Drunk On Dian Hong Black Tea

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Centuries ago Chinese black tea steadily paved its way to popularity in the west. This wasn't the case in China, where people preferred freshly processed green teas. Black tea was no more than an export, something locals dare not drink themselves. It wasn't until quite recently that Chinese farmers began rediscovering the beauty of a well-executed black tea. Dian Hong Black Tea is one of those teas that is highly honored today. Originating in Yunnan province, it is made from wild ancient tea trees. The final taste is full of qi and sure to get any tea connoisseur tea drunk in no time. (Read more)

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The 4 Ways of Drinking Tea in Ancient China

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

In today's post we will discus the origins of tea in China and ancient Chinese tea drinking methods. From 2737 BCE and all the way up to modern times, let's take a look at how tea culture transformed. (Read more)

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About Wild Tea & Ancient Trees

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

In the modern-day tea world, “wild tea trees” are a huge debate. There has been an increasing number of tea vendors that use the mystic appeal of wild tea trees as a marketing ploy. Thus more tea enthusiasts start to believe that these teas are not exactly authentic.  

The majority of ancient tea trees grown in China’s Yunnan province. Yes, the pu-erh region! 

Since they are not cultivated, they can stretch anywhere from 5 up to 10 meters in height, which makes the tea leaves challenging to harvest. (Read more)

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