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It's All About Tea — wabi sabi

Sen no Rikyu, The Great Master of Japanese Tea Ceremony

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Sen no Rikyu (1522 – 1591) is known by everyone to have the most profound influence on chanoyu, the Japanese "Way of Tea". Also known as matcha tea ceremony. Rikyu took to tiny grass-hut tea houses for his tea practices and kept promoting the wabi-sabi style of tea ceremony that he and his tea master started. (Read more)

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Chashitsu — The Japanese Tea Hut

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Chashitsu is the Japanese term for a tea room. It is a little hut, resembling a house, where Japanese tea ceremonies (chanoyu) would take place. Following tradition, matcha green tea is always served in the chashitsu, alongside with some simple sweets prepared by the tea master. It is said that chashitsu started appearing during the Sengoku period (mid-15th century to early 17th century). Before then, tea was commonly enjoyed in separate rooms and not in individual tea huts. (Read more)

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Wabi-Sabi And The Japanese Tea Ceremony

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

When thinking of Japanese culture, many of us have come across the term wabi-sabi. Although hard to define literally, wabi-sabi is a concept centered around the appreciation of imperfection. It is carried throughout many aspects of Japanese culture. From art to architecture, literature, poetry, nature, design, and one of the places it’s seen the most… tea ceremony. (Read more)

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Should You Try Kintsugi? (Japanese Pottery Repair)

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Whenever we are faced with the harsh reality of our favorite teapot that we painstakingly brought back from Japan breaking, we must ask ourselves the following question:


"Out with the old" or do I try repairing it?


For many merely throwing it away is not an option. Especially if the piece of teaware has a lot of meaning to us or if we just recently acquired it.

A quick search online and you will see kintsugi as the number one suggested method of repairing pottery. But is it really worth it? (Read more)

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Simplicity and Seasonality in Japanese Tea Ceremony

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

The Japanese tea ceremony follows two main concepts — wabi sabi and ichigo ichie. Wabi-sabi, although hard to define literally, is a concept centered around the appreciation of imperfection. While ichigo ichie is an idiom meaning “one time, one meeting” and emphasizes the fact that each and every meeting is special in that it can only happen once. (Read more)

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