It's All About Tea — wuyi

How Is Oolong Tea Processed? The Roasting Of Yancha in 5 Steps

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How Is Oolong Tea Processed? The Roasting Of Yancha in 5 Steps
One of the things that makes Wuyi Rock Tea different from all other oolongs is the roasting process that it goes through. This process is not only one step, but a few distinguished steps.

When yancha is only in the first stages of processing it's still quite vegetal and floral, much like a green tea. Only at the end of the processing will it gain its characteristic taste that we all love. (Read more)

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Describing Yan Yun: The Elegance Of Wuyi Rock Tea

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Describing Yan Yun: The Elegance Of Wuyi Rock Tea
Similarly with Cha Qi, as many gongfu-ers that exist, the many definitions of Yan Yun you may hear.

In Chinese Yan means rock, which is also where the name Yan Cha comes from — Rock Tea.

Yun, on the other hand, is much more abstract and is more of a feeling, or a knowing, than it is anything of the physical realm. (Read more)

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Why Drink Loose Leaf Tea

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Why Drink Loose Leaf Tea

Many people have believe that in order to enjoy quality tea one must spend a hefty amount of money and have extensive prior knowledge and understanding of tea in order to enjoy it. We would like to break this belief. Of course, better quality often begets a higher price, but this doesn't mean that one must compromise quality for affordability. Nor do you have to be a sommelier in order to enjoy tea. (Read more)

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The Truth Behind Black Tea

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The Truth Behind Black Tea
“Black Tea” as it's called in the West, or "Hong Cha" ("Red Tea") as it is called in Asia is well-known as an afternoon tea for it’s mellow and sweet flavor. According to legend, the Wuyi Mountains in northern Fujian, China, is where black tea was first developed. One legend tells of passing soldiers using covered piles of tea leaves as mattresses, thus bruising the leaves and creating oxidation, which gives black tea its dark color. (Read more)

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