It's All About Tea — teaware

Should You Use Kintsugi To Repair Your Broken Pottery?

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Should You Use Kintsugi To Repair Your Broken Pottery?

Whenever we are faced with the harsh reality of our favorite teapot that we painstakingly brought back from Japan breaking, we must ask ourselves the following question:


"Out with the old" or do I try repairing it?


For many merely throwing it away is not an option. Especially if the piece of teaware has a lot of meaning to us or if we just recently acquired it.

A quick search online and you will see kintsugi as the number one suggested method of repairing pottery. But is it really worth it? (Read more)

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Pairing a Yixing Teapot with Tea

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Pairing a Yixing Teapot with Tea
If you have looked into yixing clay before then you have probably heard people suggesting only to use your yixing teaware with one type of tea. This is because the clay is porous and easily absorbs flavors and aromas. (Read more)

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Japanese Teaware: The Yunomi Teacup

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Japanese Teaware: The Yunomi Teacup
Yunomi teacups are medium sized tea cups ranging anywhere from 90 to 160 ml. They are the most common used teacups in Japan and can be found in almost every eatery and home. Unlike the chawan which is used for more formal Japanese tea ceremonies, Yunomi cups are used for casual everyday tea drinking. (Read more)

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What is a Cha Hai and What do We Need It For?

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What is a Cha Hai and What do We Need It For?

When, where, and by who, the first cha hai was used by is unknown even though now it is an irreplaceable part of gong fu brewing. It is especially important to use cha hai for denser teas. Ensuring that the participants of a tea ceremony have the equal experiences is an integral part of tea culture that should not be overlooked. (Read more)

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What is a Chasen?

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What is a Chasen?
Today a chasen (bamboo whisk) is undoubtedly one of the most indispensable parts of Chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony). You might walk into a modern coffee shop or tea cafe and see the baristas preparing your matcha by shaking or blending the matcha powder with hot water (and possibly milk), but to many matcha lovers out there this is simply despicable. If you are present at a Japanese tea ceremony, you will not expect for your matcha to be whisked with anything but a chasen. (Read more)

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