It's All About Tea — pu erh

Boiling Tea: Which Tea Is Good For Boiling?

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Boiling Tea: Which Tea Is Good For Boiling?
There are two schools: one that says no to boiled water, and one that says that boiled water is totally fine. So some carefully watch (or listen) to our tea kettles, waiting for the perfect time to cut the flame off. It's true, every tea type has the ideal temperature that allows the tea leaves to open up to us in all their beauty. The perfect aroma, perfect taste – balanced brew. It is crucial to learn this.

However, during the Tang Dynasty (618 ~ 907), tea was brewed very differently from what we are used to today. People boiled tea! (Read more)

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Does Loose Leaf Tea Go Bad?

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Does Loose Leaf Tea Go Bad?
Every tea enthusiast has probably come across this scenario. We are always interested in trying many different types of tea — we order tea from various tea shops, bring tea back from holidays, and even receive tea as gifts from caring friends who are aware of our love for this magical drink.

And then one fine day, somewhere in our tea cupboard's depths, we might discover a tea that got accidentally forgotten. Or perhaps it wasn't brewed in a timely matter. Well, it might be hard to keep track of every tea we have. But has the tea already gone bad? (Read more)

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All About Tea Stuffed Tangerines (Chen Pi)

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All About Tea Stuffed Tangerines (Chen Pi)
Most commonly, chen pi (citrus peel) is associated with pu-erh or aged white teas. It is no wonder why particularly post-fermented, and aged teas go best with the dried citrus peel. Aside from tea, its use is widespread in Chinese medicine. Many people choose to drink chen pi tea precisely because of the benefits it brings, according to Chinese medicine. (Read more)

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Aging Pu-erh Tea At Home In 7 Steps

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Aging Pu-erh Tea At Home In 7 Steps
In China, fermentation is a vital part of the food culture. Sauces and condiments, tofu, pickles, wine, and even nuts. You will find at least one fermented ingredient on every dinner table in China. It is no wonder that fermentation made its way into China's extensive and well-developed tea culture. (Read more)

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The Story Of Raw Pu Erh Tea From Myanmar

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The Story Of Raw Pu Erh Tea From Myanmar
Many tea enthusiasts wouldn't consider pu-erh which is not grown and produced in Yunnan, China, to actually be pu-erh tea. We could argue that this topic requires more examination. After taking into account the geographical location of Yunnan and neighboring countries, as well as political discrepancies, we can consider the pu-erh from Guo Gan, Myanmar, to actually be called pu-erh tea. If nothing else, it is a truly aromatic, floral, and sweet tea worth the time of any pu-erh lover! (Read more)

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