It's All About Tea — history

All About The Best Jasmine Tea

Posted by Path Of Cha on

All About The Best Jasmine Tea
Jasmine tea always tops the favorites list of tea drinkers who like sweet and exceptionally aromatic teas. While most of our teas have floral aromas solely because of the processing and growing regions, the floral scent of jasmine tea actually comes from it being infused with the flowers. 

The flavor of a quality jasmine tea will be sweet, refreshing, and exceptionally aromatic! When brewing jasmine tea, the scent of the flowers immediately fills the room. It’s a celebration of the senses. The aroma of jasmine tea is known to relax and alleviate the mood. People who drink jasmine tea regularly say they feel much happier and relaxed. Particularly when choosing a tea for relaxation, we recommend jasmine tea without hesitation! (Read more)

Read more →

Tie Guan Yin, Part II

Posted by Path Of Cha on

Tie Guan Yin, Part II
In our previous blog post on Tie Guan Yin, we already discussed the brief history and processing method of this delicious oolong tea. Tie Guan Yin remains a worldwide favorite amongst tea enthusiasts. It’s in the top ten of best Chinese teas, top three best Taiwanese teas, and indeed in most if not all best oolong categories! Let’s take a more in-depth look into why this is so. (Read more)

Read more →

Lapsang Souchong vs Non-Smoky Lapsang Souchong Black Tea

Posted by Path Of Cha on

Lapsang Souchong vs Non-Smoky Lapsang Souchong Black Tea
Lapsang Souchong (Zhengshan Xiaozhong) is an acquired taste, much like a ripe pu-erh is. Some people love its deep campfire notes and the warm, comforting feeling the tea provides. Others find these roasted notes too strong and may have unwanted associations with food when drinking the tea. Luckily, for the latter, there is Non-smoky Lapsang Souchong. (Read more)

Read more →

All About Anji Bai Cha Green Tea

Posted by Path Of Cha on

All About Anji Bai Cha Green Tea

Anji Bai Cha is a comparatively young tea with a long history. Its cultivar was first re-discovered in 1982. As the name suggests, Anji Bai Cha comes from Anji County in Zhejiang province. It is still predominantly produced in Anji County, although there are a few other farms in other parts of Zhejiang province producing the tea.

 

Anji Bai Cha translates as Anji white tea, although it is a green tea variety. Why? Let's follow its long history to find out! (Read more)

Read more →

The History Of Wakoucha — Japanese Black Tea

Posted by Path Of Cha on

The History Of Wakoucha — Japanese Black Tea

Japanese black tea is referred to as koucha in Japan. Like hong cha, koucha translates as red tea and is red tea and not black tea. Wakoucha refers specifically to black tea produced in Japan. "Wa" referring to Japan in this context. The properties of Japanese black tea are the same as those of hong cha — it is a fully oxidized tea made from the leaves of camellia sinensis.

 

In a country that predominantly drinks green tea, black tea production has always taken up a tiny part of the Japanese tea production industry. (Read more) 

Read more →