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It's All About Tea — yunnan

How To Properly Loosen And Break Pu-erh Tea

Posted by Path of Cha on

How To Properly Loosen And Break Pu-erh Tea

If you are only starting to get into the vast and somewhat mysterious world of pu-erh, chances are you’ve been purchasing samples. The samples are an excellent way to get acquainted with the tea and see what you like before investing in a whole cake. An entire pu-erh cake can be pricey, but it is well worth it if you found one that you want as it will last you for many months, if not years, and in many cases only gets better with age.

After you have purchased your first cake or brick, the next step is breaking it into a size suitable for one tea session. For this, we use specially designated pu-erh tea needles. Learn about how to properly loosen and break pu-erh tea. (Read more)

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China's Four Tea Drinking Regions and Their Teas

Posted by Path of Cha on

China's Four Tea Drinking Regions and Their Teas

We all know China is a big country! With many varying climates, traditions and culture. This is also true when it comes to Chinese tea. And while tea is grown in many of China's regions, prominent tea growing regions occupy less than 50% of the whole country. The perfect tea calls for a very particular climate, ideally with high moisture and not too cold.


When purchasing loose leaf tea you’ll see that each tea comes from a different region. But would you be able to identify where it comes from based on the tea? Possibly not, but if you know which teas are grown in which region you can probably make a close guess. (Read more)

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The Legend of our Fermented Friend — Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Legend of our Fermented Friend — Pu-erh

The popularity of Pu-erh spread like wildfire near its region of origin in Southern Yunnan. Soon enough, the famed Tea Horse Road (Chamadao) found itself as a most popular trade route between Yunnan locals and the Buddhists of Tibet. The Chinese nobles were in need of horses for the transportation of goods, and the monks were more than grateful for the fermented tea... (Read more)

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The Differences Between Raw and Ripe Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Differences Between Raw and Ripe Pu-erh

There are two variations of Pu-erh tea: Sheng Pu-erh (the raw or green type) and Shu Pu-erh (the ripened or black type). 

Both Shu and Sheng Pu-erh teas are made from a sun-dried tea called Saiqing Mao Cha. After fermentation and roasting, pu-erh tea is aged, often for many years, resulting in it’s dark color and bold, mellow flavor. (Read more)

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