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It's All About Tea

What is Rock Tea?

Posted by Path of Cha on

What is Rock Tea?

Rock tea, also known as Yancha (yan meaning rock, cha meaning tea), are oolong teas that come from the Wuyi Mountains in Fujian Province, China.

Tea from this region is the most expensive in the world, with Da Hong Pao topping world records for some of the most expensive tea ever sold. (Read more)

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A Deeper Look Into Japan's Tea Cultivars

Posted by Path of Cha on

A Deeper Look Into Japan's Tea Cultivars

Every cultivar is unique because it posses its own color, flavor profile, and aroma. Some cultivars are specially cultivated to resist certain plant illnesses and pests that predominate certain areas more than others. (Read more)

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Tea Brewing Tricks

Posted by Path of Cha on

Tea Brewing Tricks

Have you ever had the experience of picking up your gaiwan, picking out your favorite tea, brewing it, and realizing the taste isn’t as good as you remember?

Or maybe you left it to steep for too long and it came out too bitter?

Whatever the case is, we got some tips and tricks on bettering the taste, so let's examine the following problems! (Read more)

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Pairing a Yixing Teapot with Tea

Posted by Path of Cha on

Pairing a Yixing Teapot with Tea

If you have looked into yixing clay before then you have probably heard people suggesting only to use your yixing teaware with one type of tea. This is because the clay is porous and easily absorbs flavors and aromas. (Read more)

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Determining A Good Quality Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

Determining A Good Quality Pu-erh

Pu-erh is a very unique tea type. For many, it’s either you like it or you don’t, and there is no in-between. It is a dark, very robust tea that has often gone through years of fermentation and births a flavor that is unusual to many.

For some, pu-erh is just not for them, no matter how many top-shelf cakes they have tried. If trying pu-erh for the first time we always recommend trying a quality sample. Otherwise, you may end up with a ruined pu-erh that will make you never want to experiment with the stuff again.

So how do we determine what would be considered a good pu-erh? (Read more)

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