FREE SHIPPING on orders over $65 International: over $250



It's All About Tea — chanoyu

Matcha Bamboo Whisk: Chasen As Part of The Japanese Tea Set

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

When you want to make your matcha in the traditional Japanese style, it's essential to invest in a proper Japanese tea set. A basic tea set will include a chawan (matcha bowl), chasen (matcha whisk), and chashaku (matcha scoop). If you want a complete Japanese tea set, however, you should also get a furui (tea sift), and a kusenaoshi (chasen holder). By the way, this is only if you want to enjoy matcha at home, casually. If you're going to make matcha as per the ways of Chado, you need much more equipment. So, if you want to make a proper bowl of frothy green matcha, if nothing else, you should always have quality matcha tea powder and a chasen. So how do we take care of the matcha whisk to ensure its longevity for years of umami-rich tea bowls to come? (Read more)

Read more →


The San Senke Of Chanoyu

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

In our recent blog post, we talked about the history of the Japanese tea sage — Sen no Rikyu. Without a doubt, he had a significant effect on The Way of Tea in Japan, and his legacy continues to this day. Ultimately there are three separate schools of Chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony) that follow his teachings to this day, although all slightly varying. These schools refer to "San Senke" — Three Sen Families. (Read more)

Read more →


Sen no Rikyu, The Great Master of Japanese Tea Ceremony

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Sen no Rikyu (1522 – 1591) is known by everyone to have the most profound influence on chanoyu, the Japanese "Way of Tea". Also known as matcha tea ceremony. Rikyu took to tiny grass-hut tea houses for his tea practices and kept promoting the wabi-sabi style of tea ceremony that he and his tea master started. (Read more)

Read more →


Zen, The Art Of Incense Burning And The Tea Ceremony

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

In the somewhat intricate world of tea ceremony, there exists a debate: incense or no incense? 

Personal preference aside, we decided to go deeper into why exactly incense can be burned during tea ceremonies. After all, this is a long tradition that has holds its roots in Buddhism and has made its way into the traditional tea ceremony. (Read more)

Read more →


All About The Japanese Cast Iron Teapot: Tetsubin

Posted by Angelina Kurganska on

Centuries ago, tetsubin were used solely for boiling water.

Nowadays they have gained immense popularity outside of Japan. We find them in many restaurants, cafes, and homes. Not only are these cast iron teapots aesthetically pleasing to the eye, with their simple zen like form; but they are also great at keeping our tea warm. (Read more)

Read more →