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It's All About Tea — ripe pu-erh

How Aging Affects Raw And Ripe Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

How Aging Affects Raw And Ripe Pu-erh

Many of us were lead to believe that it is reasonable to pay an extremely high price for a pu-erh aged 20+ years. Most often it is actually unreasonable.
In fact, older age does not equal better taste, and although there are some longer-aged pu-erhs out there with an exceptional taste, in general, this should not be your area of focus when looking to buy a delicious cake. (Read more)

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What Affects The Caffeine Content In Tea

Posted by Path of Cha on

What Affects The Caffeine Content In Tea

There are many myths surrounding the caffeine content in tea. Generally, teas that undergo more fermentation have a higher caffeine content. However there are other factors that affect the caffeine content within different teas. (Read more)

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The Legend of our Fermented Friend — Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Legend of our Fermented Friend — Pu-erh

The popularity of Pu-erh spread like wildfire near its region of origin in Southern Yunnan. Soon enough, the famed Tea Horse Road (Chamadao) found itself as a most popular trade route between Yunnan locals and the Buddhists of Tibet. The Chinese nobles were in need of horses for the transportation of goods, and the monks were more than grateful for the fermented tea... (Read more)

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The Pairing of Tea with Food

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Pairing of Tea with Food

As the times roll, more and more are becoming curious around how to assimilate tea into food culture; and it is indeed slowly turning into a regularized practice. Not only are teas fairly cheap and versatile, they can be served at different temperatures and intensities. That being said, here we'll have a broad look at how to think about pairing the 5 major tea groups with food, and the reasons behind it. (Read more)

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The Differences Between Raw and Ripe Pu-erh

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Differences Between Raw and Ripe Pu-erh

There are two variations of Pu-erh tea: Sheng Pu-erh (the raw or green type) and Shu Pu-erh (the ripened or black type). 

Both Shu and Sheng Pu-erh teas are made from a sun-dried tea called Saiqing Mao Cha. After fermentation and roasting, pu-erh tea is aged, often for many years, resulting in it’s dark color and bold, mellow flavor. (Read more)

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