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It's All About Tea — red tea

What is Grandpa Style Tea and How do We Brew It?

Posted by Path of Cha on

What is Grandpa Style Tea and How do We Brew It?

Grandpa style brewing actually is not as mysterious and fancy as it sounds.

And I’m sure we’ve all drank tea grandpa style before without even knowing it... (Read more)

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What You Need to Know About Purchasing a Yixing Teapot

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What You Need to Know About Purchasing a Yixing Teapot

Yixing teaware is renowned for being the perfect teaware when it comes to gongfucha but unfortunately, there is still some myth and confusion surrounding these teapots... (Read more)

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The Pairing of Tea with Food

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Pairing of Tea with Food

As the times roll, more and more are becoming curious around how to assimilate tea into food culture; and it is indeed slowly turning into a regularized practice. Not only are teas fairly cheap and versatile, they can be served at different temperatures and intensities. That being said, here we'll have a broad look at how to think about pairing the 5 major tea groups with food, and the reasons behind it. (Read more)

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The Five Main Types of Tea

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The Five Main Types of Tea

There are 5 main types of tea: White, Green, Blue-green (Oolong), Black (Red) and Pu-erh.

All five derive from the same plant. What accounts for their many differences are the length of time it takes for the tea leaves to become oxidized and the processing style, which can include such methods as roasting, steaming, pan-firing and aging. (Read more)

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The Truth Behind Black Tea

Posted by Path of Cha on

The Truth Behind Black Tea

“Black Tea” as it's called in the West, or "Hong Cha" ("Red Tea") as it is called in Asia is well-known as an afternoon tea for it’s mellow and sweet flavor. According to legend, the Wuyi Mountains in northern Fujian, China, is where black tea was first developed. One legend tells of passing soldiers using covered piles of tea leaves as mattresses, thus bruising the leaves and creating oxidation, which gives black tea its dark color. (Read more)

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